Put Up On: 22 March

Jean Luc Godard’s Une Femme Est Une Femme

"Are you going with him or me?"
"With whoever does the most extraordinary thing."

(Go to 6:14) So funny! So Godard. As much as I like and appreciate Breathless, Une Femme is one of my sentimental Godard favorites right next to Vivre Sa Vie. Absent are the usual shrouds of political and social commentary he includes in films like Les Carabiners. Instead there is a sugary satire of love, marriage, and American Hollywood musicals.

Put Up On: 8 February
Celeb Culture and My love for Keira Knightley
I can’t.
I try really hard to fight the urge to include photos of Keira Knightley on this blog. But it’s so difficult not to want to post photographs of such a beautiful human being on a blog that is an ode to photography, beauty, society, curiosity, and art.
I continue my journey exploring the various facets of our celebrity culture. If I am to admit to revering this actress then so be it, but I am sure the manner in which I see Keira Knightley isn’t the manner in which people devour celeb websites, Jezebel, and Kim Kardashian. This adoration of mine is different; it simply roots from my genuine appreciation of Knightley as a talented actress, a classy lady with a good head on her shoulders, a seemingly down-to-earth person who is a better inspiration to girls than the current roster of American celebrities.
This is when I ask myself about whether there is a line and where such a line is drawn when it comes to the consumption of this celebrity culture. I think, “Of course there is a line”, but then proceed to wonder about the zenith of America’s love affair with Hollywood back in the 40’s and 50’s. I think about all the differences between then and now. Girls who would look at Rita Hayworth, Marilyn Monroe, Natalie Wood, maybe primping their hair, pouting their lips, sucking their stomachs in in front of the mirror. All in admiration for the larger than life ladies of the big screen. In a way we do this too, only much has changed. When it comes to women in popular culture today, a lot of the opulence and grace has long faded. The kind of celebrity obsession we see in this era is different that that of the past. It seems that this is because of the sheer amount, pace, and saturation of famous figures permeating contemporary media. In a way, the digital age has made celebrity culture into something far uglier and even perverse than ever before. The constant stream of updates on the trivial day-to-day of celebrities creates a generation obsessed with consuming these minor details. From paparazzi to blog to reader materializes a cycle of voyeurism. I think this is one that is unique to our generation only.
I am always trying to understand the workings of our generation. I am constantly chewing on these ideas so I make no conclusions yet. In the meantime I will proceed to appreciate Keira Knightley’s godsent bone structure and feel no guilt; my own fondness for her is more of a quiet admiration.

Celeb Culture and My love for Keira Knightley

I can’t.

I try really hard to fight the urge to include photos of Keira Knightley on this blog. But it’s so difficult not to want to post photographs of such a beautiful human being on a blog that is an ode to photography, beauty, society, curiosity, and art.

I continue my journey exploring the various facets of our celebrity culture. If I am to admit to revering this actress then so be it, but I am sure the manner in which I see Keira Knightley isn’t the manner in which people devour celeb websites, Jezebel, and Kim Kardashian. This adoration of mine is different; it simply roots from my genuine appreciation of Knightley as a talented actress, a classy lady with a good head on her shoulders, a seemingly down-to-earth person who is a better inspiration to girls than the current roster of American celebrities.

This is when I ask myself about whether there is a line and where such a line is drawn when it comes to the consumption of this celebrity culture. I think, “Of course there is a line”, but then proceed to wonder about the zenith of America’s love affair with Hollywood back in the 40’s and 50’s. I think about all the differences between then and now. Girls who would look at Rita Hayworth, Marilyn Monroe, Natalie Wood, maybe primping their hair, pouting their lips, sucking their stomachs in in front of the mirror. All in admiration for the larger than life ladies of the big screen. In a way we do this too, only much has changed. When it comes to women in popular culture today, a lot of the opulence and grace has long faded. The kind of celebrity obsession we see in this era is different that that of the past. It seems that this is because of the sheer amount, pace, and saturation of famous figures permeating contemporary media. In a way, the digital age has made celebrity culture into something far uglier and even perverse than ever before. The constant stream of updates on the trivial day-to-day of celebrities creates a generation obsessed with consuming these minor details. From paparazzi to blog to reader materializes a cycle of voyeurism. I think this is one that is unique to our generation only.

I am always trying to understand the workings of our generation. I am constantly chewing on these ideas so I make no conclusions yet. In the meantime I will proceed to appreciate Keira Knightley’s godsent bone structure and feel no guilt; my own fondness for her is more of a quiet admiration.

(Source: fuckyeahkeira)

Put Up On: 23 March
Lauren Bacall

Lauren Bacall